James Mullen

A series of digital images printed at 100% of the scale of the objects depicted, and mounted into clear, acrylic box frames. The work is a meditation on the work of tromp l'ceil artists like John Haberle and John Frederick Peto.

A suite of digital works that explore ideas about destination landscapes, including documentation, classification, scientific collection, and modes of representation.

These graphics works explore the space between representation and primary experience. The source imagery is generated from 19th century prints and digital photographs that I have made at many of the actual locations depicted. The resulting mash ups consider the limits of memory, depiction, and continuity in the landscape.

This work was generated from a trip to Yosemite National Park, one of the most photographed landscapes in North America. While researching my trip I encountered a vast proliferation of search images repeatedly, and was struck by the iconic status these low resolution images attained. I decided to create images that would contrast those low definition images against the photos that I made during my visits to those sites, where they literally serve as the background for my experience there. These are meant to be larger scale prints to emphasize the pixelation at close range, while suggesting the landscape from only a greater viewing distance.